Code-First Entity Framework’s Fluent API

By Tim Daniels
This is a follow-up to my post on the Code-First Development Workflow. In that post I described how the Code-First workflow automatically generated an object model and a SQL Server database, by implementing the concept of convention over configuration. With this approach, Code-First assumes that the POCO classes defined in the Entities class library, follow the conventions of the schema that Entity Framework uses for a conceptual model. If this is the case, then Entity Framework is able to work out the details of what needs to be done, to form the object model and the relational database. However, if the conventions established in the POCO classes do not produce the desired result, you still have the ability to add configurations to your classes. As we look more closely at this approach, you will see that sometimes the best solution, is a compromise between two opposing techniques and technologies.

When I defined the domain entities for the Action Manager app, I created a one-to-many relationship between the customer object and the project object. In other words, a customer can have one-to-many projects. Here is the code where this is accomplished.

In the customer class, there is a virtual property called Projects, which is defined as a generic list of Project objects. This is known as a navigation property. The project class also has a navigation property of type customer. In this case, the navigation properties establish the convention that a customer can have one to many projects. With this bit of information, Entity Framework created the Customers table and the Projects table in the SQL Server database as illustrated here;

Fluent API Customers table and Projects table

Fluent API Cutomers table and Projects table


As you can see from the code snippet above, I chose not to clutter up the project class with a property for customer ID. However, this caused Entity Framework to create a foreign key relationship between projects and customers that allows the foreign key to be null. Obviously, this was not my intention.

With the code-first fluent API, I can configure the contextual model to generate the foreign key relationship between project and customer ID as not nullable. Here is the code where this is accomplished.

The DbContext class has an overridable method called OnModelCreating. This is where I can tweak the conventions of the entity classes, with specific configurations, to produce the desired result. In this case, the HasRequired method of the modelBuilder class, configures the Customer property of the Project entity, to be required for input. This configuration causes the foreign key relationship between project and customer ID to be defined as not nullable, as illustrated here.

Fluent API Configuration of Customers table and Projects table

Fluent API Configuration of Customers table and Projects table


Here is an outstanding article by Julie Lerman on Code First Relationships Fluent API. Julie covers this subject in more detail with several different examples of configuration through the fluent API.

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